Finding Satellite Positions

 

 

 

[Home] [Technology] [Satellite] [Finding Positions]
 

Locating Satellite Positions

By moving the satellite dish a small amount at a time you should be able to find the correct positions for the satellites. This will take some time and you may have problems identifying which satellite position the dish is pointing at.

An easier method now that you know where south is, would be to work out the approximate direction of one of the satellite positions that has a strong signal such as Astra 19.2 and then fine turn the direction with the test meter of TV. You need to know the Azimuth of Astra 19.2. You can then use a compass to mark the direction on the ground. Another way to mark the direction is to draw the angle on a piece of paper.

First note the 3 digit number on the positioner when the dish is pointing south. Then using the string and weight tied from the end of the dish boom, you can move the dish using the positioner's remote control until the weight is directly above the line marked on the ground. This should be accurate enough to 19.2 to get a signal. Then using the satellite signal test meter or TV, move the dish west and east to get the strongest signal. Note the 3 digit number on the positioner when the dish is pointing at Astra 19.2.

The relationship between the numbers shown on the positioner and the direction is not linear. For example, there will be a larger difference between when the dish is pointing between 0 and 10 (7 to 8 per degree) that when it is pointing between 30 and 40 (3 to 4 per degree). Over small sections of the arc though, it will be accurate enough to get a signal that you can then fine tune.

Once you have worked out the satellite dish positioner numbers for the satellites you are interested in, move the dish using the positioner's remote control to point the dish in that direction and fine tune the direction. Note the 3 digit number on the positioner.

 

 

© 2005-2014
A Fielding
All Rights Reserved